Posts Tagged ‘exploring abandoned’

The Top Ten Movies that Explore Abandoned Places

Written by: Cobra

So two years ago, I wrote a piece for this site covering the Top 10 Movies to be set in abandoned places. It got a shit ton of views. So last year, I wrote a sequel: the Top 10 Movies filmed in abandoned places. Now, comes part three. I love movies. I love watching them, talking about them, and being in them. But ones that involve abandoned places always interest me. Its always fun to compare fictitious abandoned places to real ones. What sets this list apart from the last one is that those were movies where the main action took place in an abandoned setting. These films only explore them. So without further ado, I bring to you – The Top Ten Movies that Explore Abandoned Places.

#10 – My Soul to Take (2010) – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0872230/

We start this list with a movie that I was in, as is tradition. Directed by horror movie master Wes Craven, this film could’ve been a lot better. Eighteen years after his alleged death, The Riverton Ripper returns to his hometown to hunt the seven children mysteriously born the night died. Every year, these seven children commemorate the date by throwing a party at the now abandoned ambulance where the Ripper was last seen.

soul-to-take

#9 – Halloween (1978) – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0077651/

Truly one of the greatest horror movies of all time, John Carpenter’s immortal classic is kind of similar to our last entry. One Halloween night, a young Michael Myers puts on a mask and his murders his sister in cold blood. Fifteen years later, he escapes from a mental institution to wreak havoc on his hometown once again. During those fifteen years he was gone, the Myers House has sat empty and abandoned. Trafficked now only be thrill-seekers and teenagers, the house is a chilling reminder of a terrible crime.

Halloween

#8 – V for Vendetta (2005) – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0434409/ 

Whether you love it or hate it, this film certainly is unique. It’s style, story line, and performances are all quite different from your average comic book adaption. Set in a dark future where Great Britain is ruled under a fascist government, a mysterious freedom fighter named V aims to take down the regime and restore freedom to the people. The film’s climatic end and fight scene take place in the abandoned London Underground train system. With its shadowy lighting and creepy aesthetics, it really brings the scene to life.

vendetta

#7 – Inception (2010) – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1375666/ 

I’m not even going to try to explain the plot of this film. Seriously, its so intricate and deep (in a good way) you’re just going to have to watch it. All I will say it takes place in the world of dreams. And in this world, the deepest level is Limbo. Or in simpler terms, unconstructed dream space. Our main character Dom, played marvelously by Leo DiCaprio, returns to Limbo years after building a city with his lost love. Now, it stands in ruins. Populated only by memories and the ghosts of his past.

Limbo

#6 – Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2015381/ 

I really don’t care for the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but I love this movie. I sometimes wish that Marvel would just keep the Guardians separate from the rest of the MCU. Anyways, an unlikely group of intergalactic misfits are forced to team up to save the universe from certain destruction. James Gunn brings a fabulous soundtrack, memorable characters (except for his annoying brother), and a great story to life. One stop on this grand adventure is the abandoned planet Morag. It may be just a pit-stop in the overall film, but its still a really cool location.

Morag

#5 – Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2527336/

The most polarizing Star Wars film ever made. After destroying the destructive Starkiller Base in the previous film, our heroes are now being pursued across the galaxy by the villainous First Order. They manage to make their final stand at an abandoned Rebellion base on the salt planet of Crait. Say what you will about this film (personally I despise it) but Crait really is one of the coolest planets we’ve ever seen in the series. The visuals are stunning, the set design is on point, and the abandoned planet makes for a fitting setting for the film’s climax.

Crait

#4 – Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018) – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4881806/

After the massive success of its predecessor, it really isn’t surprising that we’re getting a sequel. And this one looks even better. The Jurassic World park is now abandoned. Dinosaurs roam freely once again. But when a volcano threatens to destroy the island once and for all, our heroes must rally together for a rescue mission. Seeing the once captivating resort park of the first film in such a state of decay gives this film a really cool vibe. And while we still have a few weeks until it hits theaters, the trailers sure look promising.

Jurassic

#3 – The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012) –  https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0903624/

When you try to turn a three-hundred page book into three three-hour movies, things don’t usually come out so good. And that’s coming from a die-hard Lord of the Rings fan. Now that that’s out of the way, this trilogy starter tells of the adventure of Bilbo Baggins before the events of the original trilogy. The young Hobbit ends up whisked off on an adventure to reclaim the Dwarf kingdom of Erebor. Along the way, the wizard Gandalf makes a trek to the abandoned fortress of Dol Guldur. Evil spirits now haunt the empty corridors, and this place become a backdrop of villainy for the entire trilogy.

Dol_Guldur

#2 – The Hills Have Eyes (2006) – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0454841/

One of my personal favorite horror films. It is just so damn intense. A remake of Wes Craven’s 1977 cult classic, this film more or less proved to the world that remakes of horror films can actually be good when put in the right hands. The story follows the Carter Family, traveling across the desert to California. They are eventually set upon by a dangerous group of people living in the hills. Towards the end of the film, the film winds up in an abandoned nuclear test site from the Cold War. And it is really spooky. Ghostly mannequins, derelict buildings, and old cars make this ghost town a terrifying setting.

HHE

#1 – Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004) – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0304141/

“I solemnly swear that I am up to no good.” One of my personal favorite films in the Harry Potter series, this story follows his third year at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. A dark figure from Harry’s past and convicted murderer Sirius Black has escaped from the wizard prison Azkaban, and is coming after him. With the help of his friends and new Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher, Harry Potter goes on quite an adventure. One of the key sites of that adventure is the notorious Shrieking Shack. Believed to be the most haunted building in the country, this abandoned house plays a major role in the film’s climax.

Shriekingshack

And that’s our list! Did we miss any out? Let us hear about it in the comments below!

 

Top 5 Abandoned Places to Go Hiking

Posted: March 20, 2017 by kingleser in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Cabin, Abandoned Connecticut, Abandoned Drive-In, abandoned home, Abandoned Hospital, Abandoned House, abandoned military bases, abandoned mill, abandoned new england, Abandoned Railway, Abandoned train station, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Wonders, Berkshires, Bolton, Broken, Closed, commercial, Connecticut, darkness, Death, Destruction, dreams, empty, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, Fortress, Forts, Graveyard, Hiking, History, Homeless, Information, left behind, Massachusetts, Military, Military Forts, Mystery, nature, new england, Nike Missile Base, overgrown, photography, Portland, Public Parks, research, Ruins, Safety First, Searching, State Parks, Stories, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, Williamtic, writing
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Top 5 Abandoned Places to Go Hiking

Written by: Sean L.

Photographs by: Amanda H.

Hiking is the whole reason we ever got into this. We accidentally stumbled upon the abandoned Sunrise Resort while hiking at a state park in Moodus. The rest is history. When we plot an investigation, it is usually to go explore something like a big abandoned building. But every once in awhile, we come across a place that may not be as exciting as an abandoned asylum but is still a fun place to hike. There may not be too much to see, but its nice to just be outdoors and do some exploring. Here are a few of our favorite abandoned places across New England to go hiking!

#5 – Manchester Drive-In (Manchester, CT)

This is another place that we just accidentally stumbled upon. While driving home from the office, I would see a large skeletal frame looming out of the woods. I thought it was just an old billboard, but upon further exploration we uncovered that it was actually the ruins of the old Manchester Drive-In movie theater. Unfortunately, there is not much to see here. But the old sign still sits out front, and the old screen looms high and daunting in the sky. With good weather, it is a really nice hike.

#4 – Aspinwall Hotel (Lenox, MA)

And once again, this was another place we just found. We were staying up in the Berkshires as I had a big audition up there. We went for a short walk by our hotel, and found the ruins of the Aspinwall Hotel. Once one of the most popular hotels in all of New England, this former hotspot was burned to the ground at the turn of the century. Now only ghostly ruins still stand all over the woods. But the picturesque mountain view and the lovely wooded setting make this one a very cool visit.

#3 – Willimantic River Railway (Willimantic, CT)

This place can be a little spooky. It was once part of the lifeblood of the rail system all along the East Coast. Now, she is nothing more than a shadow of her former self. The local homeless population uses this area from time to time as a makeshift tent community. But they periodically seem to get kicked out. Plus stretching over the untamed Willimantic River still stands the old tressell, aka The Bridge of Death. Crossing it is certainly one thing that we crossed off our bucket list. Watch your step, and don’t look down.

#2 – Shade Swamp Shelter (Farmington, CT)

This is certainly one of the more unique and underrated places that we have ever visited. It really doesn’t get enough attention. Once a wildlife shelter and sanctuary, this historic landmark now sits empty in the middle of the woods just off a very busy road. Along a winding trail, there are dozens of old enclosures, cages, and habitats that once housed the former residents of this shelter. On a nice sunny day, this place is not only great for hiking but is also a treasure trove for all you nature photographers out there.

#1 – Nike Missile Site (Portland, CT)

Our number one pick just happens to be in the middle of a state forest. It may be a gigantic pain in the ass to get to, but its really worth it if you can make the trip. Unpaved roads, untamed wilderness, and a total lack of other people can hinder your journey. But if you can find the lost Nike Missile site deep in the woods, you’re in for a real treat. The two sites are about a mile from each other. One features a few still standing structures. The other still has its tunnel system (which we recommend you stay out of). Of all the places on this list, this one is truly all about exploration.

And that’s our list! Got any other places you think are great for hiking? Be sure to let us know! Don’t forget to like, share, and subscribe.

One Day Too Late

The Abandoned Ladd School

Written by: Sean L.

Photographs by: Amanda H.

Let me start this off by saying that this was a spontaneous visit. We didn’t really plan on searching for this lost legend, it just happened to be on our way. Rhode Island is one of my favorite places to visit in all of New England. I make several trips a year up there to work on movies, but its rare we go up there together to explore abandoned places. We had just finished our exploration of the Enchanted Forest, and were on our way to an audition of mine. I had heard many stories about the Ladd School. Some said that it had been demolished years ago. Others said that pieces of it still stood. A quick stop at Google Maps and around the web proved to be inconclusive. Some said it had been destroyed. Others said that certain buildings could still be seen and explored. With its location a mere stone’s throw away from us, we decided to check it out. It appears now that we were too late.

Much like most mental institutions in the area, the Ladd School has seen many different names and purposes over the years. Before earning its current name, the facility was formerly known as “The Exeter School” and “The Rhode Island School for the Feeble Minded.” Opening in the early 1900’s, the institution began as an experimental program to train the intellectually disabled on basic life and farm skills. But over the years the Ladd School evolved into something else entirely. Unfortunately, much like most similar institutions, she suffered from overcrowding, public disapproval, and scandals. She limped on up until 1993, when her doors were finally closed for good. For years, she was left empty and desolate. She became a hotspot for local ghost hunters and independent film makers. The order for her demolition finally came a few years later. Certain buildings were razed, others found life by being re-purposed.

When we arrived on the grounds on that chilly early March day, it was hard to believe that this was once one of the most well known schools in the area. The grounds are unrecognizable today. We drive around for a long time without finding anything that even resembling the stories we had read. There was a large soccer field there. A few multi-purpose buildings stood around. Large groups of people were jogging and/or walking around the grounds. We almost thought we were in the wrong place. Until we came upon a quiet pocket of the area. Standing far off from any visitors was a memorial for the old grounds. Protected by a stone wall, it almost looked like a graveyard. But in the center of it all sits a plaque detailing the history of the Ladd School. It appears that this may be all that is left of the now famous school. There may be more evidence out there, but we weren’t able to find it. It seems that the old Ladd School is gone. All that remains is this quiet memorial, and memories long since passed.

Top 5 Abandoned Places that Aren’t There Anymore

Posted: February 22, 2017 by kingleser in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Baseball Field, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Cabin, Abandoned Connecticut, Abandoned Fairgrounds, abandoned home, Abandoned Hospital, Abandoned House, abandoned mill, abandoned new england, abandoned paper mill, Abandoned Resort, Abandoned Sanatorium, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Wonders, Broken, Cabin, Children's Hospital, Closed, commercial, Connecticut, darkness, Death, Destruction, East Haddam Connecticut, empty, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, for sale, Forgotten, forgotten beauty, forgotten home, Ghosts, Graveyard, Haunting, Hiking, History, Information, left behind, lost, Meriden CT, Mystery, nature, new england, nightmares, overgrown, paper mill, photography, Public Parks, research, Ruins, Safety First, Searching, State Parks, Stories, Sunrise Resort, Talcottville Mill, Uncategorized, Undercliff Sanatorium, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex
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Top 5 Abandoned Places that Aren’t There Anymore

Guess what? It’s still winter, and there’s still a ton of snow on the ground. It’s hindered us from several planned urban exploration journeys this month. But we really like to keep getting things out there for our followers to read. We really do appreciate your support. Since the last few Top 5 Lists we’ve published lately have gotten some decent views, let’s keep this going. Parting is such sweet sorrow, and there are several abandoned places we’ve covered here on our site that regrettably have been demolished since we’ve visited them. Here are the Top 5 Abandoned Places that Aren’t There Anymore.

#5 – The Green House, Andover, Connecticut

The Green House was an absolute chill in the bone to visit. We had been covering abandoned places for several years at this point. But for some reason, this abandoned house was really disturbing to me. Literally everything had been left behind. Toys. Clothes. Furniture. Workout equipment. Hell, there was even still food in the fridge. It was like whoever lived here had just disappeared one day. But recently, the entire house has been refinished. All the trash has been cleaned out. The siding has been replaced. It looks like a brand new house. She is either currently for sale, or already been sold. While she was once a terribly haunting specter of her former self, her story actually got a happy ending.

#4 – Norton Paper Mill, Colchester, Connecticut

I grew up right down the street from this place. I used to drive by it all the time on my way to the coast. After a raging fire had left this place totally gutted, she simply stood there for many years as a ghostly skeleton. The entire place was fenced off, but you could still see the remnants of what this place used to be. In the last few months, the property has been reacquired by the town of Colchester, and been scheduled for demolition. The damn that was once the life source of the mill has already been removed, and what still stands of her bare remains is next on the chopping block. But it is all done in the name of the environment. With the damn removed, fish can now swim up the river. And with the old mill gone, she can finally rest in piece.

#3 – Talcottville Mill, Vernon, Connecticut

Back in 2015, we named this place the #1 abandoned place we had visited that year. It earned that honor for a reason, as this place was huge and captivating. There was so much to see here, with massive amounts of space simply left behind. But today, that is no more. Shortly after our visit to the historic Talcottville Mill, funding was approved by the local government to redevelop the area into apartment complexes. The work got underway shortly after that, and continues as we speak. The property has stood for almost 150 years, and after being abandoned for some time, is finally getting a makeover. After sitting silently for far too long, the historic Talcottville Mill will finally be working to serve the local community once again.

#2 – Undercliff Sanatorium, Meriden, Connecticut

To date, this is still my favorite abandoned place that I have ever explored. And though she is now long gone, she will always hold a special place in my heart. Even after all these years she still remains such a mystery. Once heralded as one of the most haunted places in all of Connecticut, Undercliff Sanatorium had quite the story. Serving for years as a state hospital and institution, the main hospital was closed in the 1970’s. Though the rest of the grounds remained operational. For years, she was a major target for urban explorers and ghost hunters. Many legends and stories abounded about this place. And I can tell you from experience, it more than lived up to its reputation. Sadly, the main hospital was razed beginning in 2013. Though we have yet to make a return trip, I am sure that the ghosts of Undercliff still haunt these wooded grounds.

#1 – Sunrise Resort, East Haddam, Connecticut

Of course it was going to be this. It’s no secret that this was our first exploration. We even did a three part piece on it a few years ago. And anyone who was around to explore this place before it was demolished should know why this place has earned the top stop. Sunrise Resort was functional and flourishing for years. I even went there once a kid for a class picnic. Returning to it years later after its closure was breathtaking. Windows were smashed. Copper wiring was ripped from the walls. The massive in-ground pool had been drained. The baseball field had grown wild and dangerous. It was an apocalyptic ghost town. The scariest part of all? It was all legal to visit, due to its status as a state park. But sadly, that was her undoing as certain state officials pushed hard for her demolition. And it was all for the best. Today, Sunrise State Park can now be enjoyed by all. And if you look close enough, you can still see the shadows of the former resort.

And that’s our list! Know of any other great abandoned places that aren’t there anymore? Please leave us a comment! We look forward to hopefully getting some new material out here soon!

Top 5 Abandoned Places to Visit this Summer

Posted: February 3, 2017 by kingleser in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Baseball Field, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Cabin, Abandoned Cape Cod, Abandoned Connecticut, Abandoned Forts, Abandoned Hospital, Abandoned House, Abandoned Massachusetts, abandoned military bases, abandoned new england, Abandoned Rhode Island, Abandoned Sanatorium, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Wonders, Bates Motel, Beaches, Cape Cod, Children's Hospital, Connecticut, empty, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, Forgotten, Fort Wetherill, Fortress, Forts, Hiking, History, Massachusetts, Military, Military Forts, Movies, Mystery, Napatree Point, new england, Ocean, Ocean View, photography, Public Parks, Rhode Island, Ruins, Seaside Sanatorium, State Parks, Stories, Truro, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, Waterford, writing
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Winter sucks. I mean it really sucks sometimes. Especially if you live here in New England. One day it will be fifty degrees out. The next day there will be a foot of snow on the ground. Hooray. Things can be a bit unpredictable. As such, we usually slow down a bit on our adventures during the winter. When you’re exploring a place that you really aren’t supposed to be at, leaving footprints in the snow is never a good idea. Plus most of these places get really cold during the winter time. So, since we don’t really have anything new for you guys right now, it’s time to look ahead. Sitting here, with a few inches of snow on the ground outside, here are the Top 5 Abandoned Places to Visit this Summer.

#5 – Seaside Sanatorium, Waterford, Connecticut

We talk about Seaside Sanatorium a lot on here. But it really is a cool place. Sitting pretty right on the lovely Long Island Sound, this place has changed quite a bit over the years. Built in the early 1920’s, this massive hospital has seen a lot. It was regrettably closed in the 1990’s, and has declined ever since. Due to its status as a National Park, it is heavily frequented by beach-goers. Yet none of them seem to pay attention to this place. In our most recent visit, fences and major construction has taken over Seaside Sanatorium. Though round the clock security guards protect the abandoned asylum, it is still a beautiful sight to see.

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#4 – Bates Motel, Truro, Massachusetts 

Is it really called Bates Motel? We don’t know. Hell, nobody seems to know. That is just the moniker that this mysterious abandoned motel has earned due to its similarity to the legendary locale from Psycho. We love this place because it is just so mysterious. Located in a flourishing beach-side community, Bates Motel is a creepy and ramshackle relic of days gone by. The sun shines brightly overheard, and the beautiful blue ocean stands at her back. Yet she remains quiet as a tomb. In recent years, it has diminished greatly. Yet she still stands, waiting for something that will never come.

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#3 – Fort Mansfield, Watch Hill, Rhode Island

This one is a bit of a hike. It really is a pain in the ass to find, especially if the wind is blowing. Its about a mile down Nappatree Point, hidden amongst a bird sanctuary. But if you can find it, this old coastal fortress really is something special. Hidden amongst the sea grass and wild vegetation lies the remains of Fort Mansfield. Due to a fatal flaw in her design, she was deemed unfit for use by the military and eventually retired. It is quite similar to her cousin Fort Wetherill, which we’ll get to. But Fort Mansfield is far more desolate and much more isolated. What’s left makes for a very cool and unique adventure, if you can brave the long walk down the sandy beach.

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#2 – North Truro Air Force Station, Truro, Massachusetts

Yes, another great place to visit on Cape Cod. It may be one of the most picturesque parts of New England, but it has its share of secrets. And one of the best kept ones is this abandoned military base. It is the largest place on this list, and completely legal to visit. Left empty since the nineties, this old Cold War base is now nothing more than a ghost town. Dozens of old houses still stand. The old helipad is still there. The baseball field is now wild and overgrown. There is so much to see here. We literally spent an entire day exploring this place, taking hundreds of photos. It really is that awesome.

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#1 – Fort Wetherill, Jamestown, Rhode Island

Our piece that wrote on this place is still the most popular one we have ever written. And for good reason. Fort Wetherill really is a magical place. Sitting right outside the luxurious community of Newport, Rhode Island, this abandoned fortress sits right at the edge of the sea. It is certainly one of the toughest abandoned places we have ever visited, in the sense that this place has been through a lot and still stands. It is completely legal to visit, and unfortunately many vandals take advantage of that. But her graffiti covered exterior just makes this place that much more hauntingly beautiful.

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And that’s our list! Did we miss any out? Are there any cool places in New England that you plan on visiting this summer? Let us know in the comments. Likes, shares, and such are always appreciated!

The Top 5 Abandoned Places of 2016

Posted: December 30, 2016 by kingleser in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Amusement Park, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Cabin, Abandoned Cape Cod, Abandoned Connecticut, Abandoned Farm, Abandoned Forts, abandoned home, Abandoned Hospital, Abandoned House, Abandoned Massachusetts, abandoned military bases, abandoned new england, Abandoned Racetrack, Abandoned Resort, Abandoned Rhode Island, Abandoned Ski Area, Abandoned Stores, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Vermont, Abandoned Wonders, Beaches, Cape Cod, Closed, Connecticut, Destruction, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, Ghosts, Haunting, Hiking, History, Hogback Mountain, Information, Massachusetts, Military, Military Forts, Mystery, Mystic, nature, new england, Ocean View, photography, Public Parks, Rhode Island, Ruins, Stories, Truro, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, Vermont, writing
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Please check out our second annual Top 5 Abandoned Places video! It covers all of the best places we’ve explored this year. Happy New Year, everyone!

Black Diamond – The Abandoned Hogback Mountain Ski Area

Posted: December 21, 2016 by kingleser in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Cabin, abandoned home, Abandoned House, abandoned new england, Abandoned Resort, Abandoned Ski Area, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Vermont, Abandoned Wonders, Bird Watching, Birds, Broken, Cabin, Closed, commercial, darkness, Death, Destruction, empty, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, Forgotten, forgotten beauty, forgotten home, Ghosts, Graveyard, Haunting, Hiking, History, Hogback Mountain, House, Information, left behind, lost, Marlborough, Movies, Mystery, nature, new england, nightmares, overgrown, photography, Public Parks, research, Ruins, Safety First, Searching, State Parks, Stories, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, Vermont, writing
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Black Diamond

The Abandoned Hogback Mountain Ski Area

Written by: Sean L.

Photographs by: Amanda H.

I have lived in New England my entire life. I was born here, and I will probably die here too. But I’ve never been a skier. I tried snowboarding when I was a kid. But after splitting my face open a few too many times I eventually outgrew it. Up here in New England, skiing is one of our biggest draws and most memorable past times. Most of you reading this probably know a skier, or even are one yourself. My next door neighbors were all skiers when I was growing up. They even had their own personal lodge up in the mountains. Ski Club was also the largest club at my high school. And the big place where it’s most common? Vermont. This was my first time back here in many years. It was a place I used to visit annually back in the Scouts. Believe it or not this was our first investigation up in the Green Mountain State. And it did not disappoint.

Bordering New York State and the Canadian border, Vermont is one of the most picturesque places in all of New England. It has rolling hills, quiet forests, and an old school mountain culture. Tourism is a big thing here, and the jewel in that crown is skiing. It has been a large part of Vermont’s heritage throughout the years. Many ski areas, such as Mount Snow and Smuggler’s Notch, have become local juggernauts in the business. But many have not been as successful. In southern Vermont is the heavily trafficked Hogback Mountain Conservation Area. But little do most tourists seem to know is that this was once the Hogback Mountain ski area. Opening in the years following World War II, the ski area found moderate success but was eventually forced to fold in the 1980’s due to declining attendance. The land was then sold off to the local community and rechristened.

Right along the busy Route 9 in Marlboro, Vermont, is the Hogback Mountain Tourist Area. You really can’t miss it. You round a corner, and boom. People are everywhere. Cars from all over the world are pulled over at the makeshift parking lot to get a glimpse of the gorgeous mountain view and pick up some campy souvenirs at the gift shop. Their cheese is actually pretty good though. But sitting just off to the side of this tourist attraction are the ghosts of what once was. A short walk to the right from the tourist area is what remains of the ski slope. A small wooden shed still stands, and bears the name of “Hogback Mountain Ski Area.” A large number of old tools and skis have been left behind inside. Though they are now coated with dust, it appears they were simply throw to the floor and forgotten about. Luckily, we found very little signs of vandalism.

The star attraction of the ski area though has got to be the remains of the old chair lift. A large turbine still stands glistened in the sunlight, though she is now rusted to all Hell. The two large wheels which once brought skiers to the top of the slope are now nothing more than tattered ruins. We tried to follow the old slope up the mountain, but the vegetation was too thick. There may be more up there, but we could not find a way up. Walking back to the left of the ski area are what we believe to be the remains of the lodge. A large white building, she now sits precariously close the edge of the mountain. She looks so structurally unsound, its remarkable she’s still standing at all. A few pieces of old furniture still wait inside for someone to return to them. Peeking in through the window was almost like taking a peek back in time.

For our first investigation in the great state of Vermont, this was certainly an interesting visit. I personally found it fascinating to see so many people flocking to the tourist area, and yet experiencing total solitude mere yards away at the ruins of the ski area. It has become a ghost to the rest of the community, haunting the mountain with the memories of its former glory. It is indeed curious why these old relics where not demolished when the land was sold off. While other ski areas flourish and thrive, this one was forced to close up shop. It is good that the land has found another use, and that so many people from so many places can now enjoy it. But it is still sad to see a place like this in a state such as that. For life, as we all know, is a lot like a ski slope. Some are able to navigate it all the way to the bottom and enjoy the ride. Most of us, however, just end up falling on our asses.