Posts Tagged ‘abandoned’

The Top Ten Fictional Abandoned Places

Written by: Wilk

So two years ago, I wrote a piece for this site covering the Top 10 Movies to be set in abandoned places. It got a shit ton of views. So last year, I wrote a sequel: the Top 10 Movies filmed in abandoned places. Now, comes part three. I love movies. I love watching them, talking about them, and being in them. But ones that involve abandoned places always interest me. Its always fun to compare fictitious abandoned places to real ones. What sets this list apart from the last one is that those were movies where the main action took place in an abandoned setting. These films only explore them. So without further ado, I bring to you – The Top Ten Fictional Abandoned Places.

#10 – Razorback Point – Alien vs. Predator (2004)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0370263/

We start this list with a nostalgic bang. Yes, the PG-13 rating kind of killed the mood. And yes, the characters aren’t as fun as we’re used to from these franchises. But Alien vs. Predator really isn’t as bad as people remember it being. When a billionaire’s satellite picks up an image of a mysterious pyramid under the ice of Antarctica, a secret team is dispatched to investigate. Their point of access to this phantom structure is the now abandoned Razorback Point whaling station. Abandoned for decades, this former crossroads is now literally frozen in time. Our characters eventually find their way down through the ice to the pyramid, only to find themselves caught in the eternal war between xenomorphs and predators. Given that there are plenty of actual places like Razorback Point left behind in the tundras of the Arctic make it a very smooth and suspenseful set piece. And though it may take a long time for the movie to get going, it does get better with time.

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#9 – Camp Crystal Lake – Friday the 13th (2009)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0758746/

Truly, I am going to try my best to keep the horror movies to a limit here. We could honestly do a whole list of just horror movies. Maybe someday we will… Anyway, I know this was the remake, which not too many people were thrilled with. But I liked the remake. Maybe it was because I actually got to see it in theaters when I was a teenager…unlike the other films in this franchise. It just has a totally different experience. We all know the story. Only this time, the summer camp where Jason Vorhees tragically drowned is now abandoned. Or is it? Having closed after all the nightmarish events of the previous films, the resurrected hockey mask killer now calls this derelict wasteland home. And he will slay anyone who sets foot into what is now his domain. This includes the usual gaggle of hapless teenagers and burned out TV actors. But personally, I think the abandoned setting makes for a wonderfully creepy backdrop to a passable horror remake.

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#8 – Doctor Octopus’ Lair – Spider-Man 2 (2004)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0316654/

Unfortunately, this list is going to be mostly horror movies, as mentioned above, and comic book movies. I don’t know what the connection is there, but both genres seem to have a lot of abandoned settings. Before the MCU, this film was often considered to be the end-all/be-all of superhero films. As the second outing in Sam Raimi’s Spiderman trilogy, the webslinger this time finds himself up against a new adversary: Doctor Octopus. Portrayed in the film masterfully by Alfred Molina, the former Otto Octavius becomes an almost dark reflection of Peter Parker after a science experiment gone wrong drives him mad. On the run from the law, this newly born and conflicted super-villain hides out in an abandoned pier on the East River. The old building is slowly sinking into the water, just as its new occupant slowly descends deeper into madness. This very cool set piece serves not only as Doc Ock’s hideout, but is also the battleground for he and Peter’s final confrontation.

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#7 – Parrish Shoe Factory – Jumanji (1995)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113497/ 

This was one of my absolute favorite movies growing up. It’s just a very well-paced and enjoyable flick that anyone of any age can enjoy. We even used to play the actual board game on particularly hot summer days. One of the late/great Robin Williams’ finest roles, Jumanji tells the story of a magical board game that brings the world of the mystical jungle into our own. And when Allan Parrish (Williams’ character) emerges from said board game, after spending 26 years lost in this alternate dimension, he finds the world he once knew long gone. His parents are dead. His home belongs to someone else. His town lies in ruin. But the most memorable stop on his journey to rediscovery is his father’s now abandoned shoe factory. After his disappearance, all of his family’s money went to trying to find him. Learning just how far his world has fallen, and just how hard his father tried to find him after his disappearance, is damn near heartbreaking. Regardless of how you feel about the reboot/remake/sequel, watch this film.

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#6 – Planet Morag – Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2015381/ 

I really don’t care for the Marvel Cinematic Universe sometimes. I used to really enjoy it when it was first starting out over a decade ago. I just feel like it has grown too large, and most of the movies feel repetitive to me. That said, I absolutely love this film. I sometimes wish that Marvel would just keep the Guardians separate from the rest of the MCU. Anyways, an unlikely group of intergalactic misfits/jackasses are forced to team up to save the universe from certain destruction. Director James Gunn (as always) brings a fabulous soundtrack, memorable characters (except for his annoying brother), and a great story to life. One stop, in fact the first stop, on this grand adventure is the abandoned planet Morag. We never find out why an entire planet is abandoned, but it’s still really cool. It may be just a pit-stop in the overall film, but its still a very unique location. Plus, we get a nice call back to it later in the series during Avengers: Endgame.

Morag

#5 – Mexican Smelting Plant – Logan (2017)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt3315342/

The last hurrah for everyone’s favorite X-Man, and a film that many consider to be one of the greatest comic book movies of all time. While I think they had a little too much fun with the film’s R-rating, Logan is an absolute classic and a more than fitting end to such an iconic character. Following Wolverine/Logan/Jimmy/Weapon X/Whatever on what will be his final adventure, the film opens with the titular character living in hiding with Professor X in an abandoned smelting plant down in Mexico. He drives a limo for money, and keeps a low profile after the near extinction of all mutant kind. But it isn’t long before the bad guys show up and all kinds of action ensues. But this abandoned backdrop sets the stage for what is honestly one of the most humanistic films ever made to come out of the superhero mythos. It’s a damn shame we never got a Liev Schrieber cameo, though…

Logan

#4 – Jurassic World – Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4881806/

After the massive success of its predecessor and the three films that came before that, it really isn’t surprising that we got an even bigger sequel. And this one looked even better. After the bloody disastrous events of the first film, the Jurassic World theme park is now abandoned. Imagine that. Tourist shops decay after years of neglect. Trams and trolleys have been destroyed. And the dinosaurs now roam freely once again. But when a volcano threatens to destroy the island once and for all, our heroes must rally together for a rescue mission. Seeing the once captivating resort park of the first film in such a state of decay gives this film a really cool vibe. Unfortunately, this was only a precursor to a very plodding and straight up awful film. Seriously. I hated it. I thought it was worse than Jurassic Park III. But…the abandoned Jurassic World setting is really really cool.

Jurassic

#3 – Dol Guldur – The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0903624/

Maybe I am being a little too negative with this piece. But when you try to turn a three-hundred page book into three three-hour long movies, things don’t usually come out so good. And that’s coming from a die-hard Lord of the Rings fan. I know it’s not Peter Jackson’s fault. But still. This trilogy was a mess. Now that that’s out of the way, the first chapter in this story tells of the adventures of Bilbo Baggins before the events of the original trilogy. Offered a spot in a mysterious company of dwarves, the young Hobbit ends up whisked off on an adventure to reclaim the lost kingdom of Erebor. Along the way, the wizard Gandalf makes a trek to the abandoned fortress of Dol Guldur. Evil spirits now haunt the empty corridors (including a rather infamous Dark Lord), and this place become a backdrop of villainy for the entire trilogy.

Dol_Guldur

#2 – Sector 13 – The Hills Have Eyes (2006)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0454841/

One of my personal favorite horror films. It is just so damn intense. A remake of Wes Craven’s 1977 cult classic, The Hills Have Eyes more or less proved to the world that remakes of horror films can actually be good when put in the right hands. Director Alexander Aja takes Craven’s original premise and puts a very unique twist on it all. The story follows the Carter Family, traveling across the western desert to California on vacation. After a wrong turn, they are eventually set upon by a dangerous group of people living in the radioactive hills of New Mexico. All sorts of bloody carnage and barbaric madness follows suit. Towards the end of the film, our hero winds up in an abandoned nuclear test site from the Cold War. And it is really spooky. Ghostly mannequins, derelict buildings, and old cars make this ghost town a terrifying setting.

HHE

#1 – The Shrieking Shack – Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004)

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0304141/

“I solemnly swear that I am up to no good.” One of my personal favorite films in the Harry Potter series, this story follows our titular hero’s third year at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. A dark figure from Harry’s past and convicted murderer Sirius Black has escaped from the wizard prison Azkaban, and is coming after him. With the help of his trusted friends and new Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher, Harry Potter goes on quite an adventure. One of the key sites of that adventure is the notorious Shrieking Shack. It’s importance is subtly teased throughout the film. Believed to be the most haunted building in the country, this abandoned house plays a major role in the film’s climax. With an outstanding soundtrack, a darker tone from the previous films, and some wonderful new additions to the cast, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is a must-see.

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And that’s our list! Did we miss any out? Let us hear about it in the comments below!

 

Fallen Attraction

The Abandoned Gillette Castle Railroad

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

In the absence of light, darkness prevails. When there is no heat, there is only cold. And without love, there is nothing left but despair. It’s funny because Gillette Castle, along with Hublien Tower, was one of my favorite places to visit when I was a kid. A short half-hour drive away, it was one of those magical places to visit and get ice cream at during the heydays of summertime. With its winding trails and classical feel, it truly is a sight to see. I honestly believed I had hiked every inch of this park. But I was wrong. Lost deep in the woods and along the rocky banks of the Connecticut River is the fallen attraction of this fabled place – The Gillette Castle Railroad.

Located in picturesque East Haddam, Connecticut, Gillette Castle was the luxurious and mystical castle of prolific actor William Gillette. With no children to leave his estate to, Gillette left the grounds to the state of Connecticut after his passing. Today it is enjoyed by many for its hiking and wonderful view of the Connecticut River. But unbeknownst to most, myself included for a time, is that there once stood a railroad around the estate. Though it was a small train, which can now be viewed at the Visitor’s Center, tracks once covered the entire grounds to carry visitors from place to place. When it was originally sold off, most of the tracks were ripped up and the old railroad disappeared…but not completely.

We made our trip to Gillette Castle on one of the final weekends of summertime 2017. The park was just as lively as I had remembered it. But far down one of the quieter sides of the grounds lie the remains of the railroad. An old bridge has been closed down for being unstable. Another has collapsed into the underbrush. Far down the cliffs by the roaring Connecticut River stand several old pieces of track and framework. Old rusty barrels rot into the fertile forest floor. But the star of the show is by far the old tunnel. Though it may not run as long as we had hoped, inside is pure unadulterated darkness. With its entrance nearly lost to the woods around it, its certainly a fun little walk through.

A special shout-out of this piece goes to our reader who called himself “Mike.” A few weeks ago, he contacted us with several suggestions of places to visit in his area including the Gillette Castle Railroad. And this place really didn’t disappoint. Truth be told, we really don’t get as much fan interaction as we would like. And we love it when people tell us their stories or suggest places for us to explore. It makes this hobby just a little bit more fun and meaningful. I wish that I had been able to see this railroad during its heyday, but alas, it is no more. Though this is more of a hiking piece, the old train tunnel really is pretty cool. And just as this place was highly recommended for us to visit, I encourage you to do the same.

My Sweet Summer

The Abandoned Case Cabin

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

What is it about summer time that makes it so magical? To me, it always seems like the shortest season. When I was a kid, August was my least favorite month of the year. And it was because the shadow of September and the dread of going back to school made it so hard to enjoy anything. But July, that was always the best. Vacations. Ice cream. The beach. Hiking. All the best summer memories come from July. And yet it always feels like the shortest month of the year. You had no worries about school, or homework. All that mattered was having fun. But I guess that’s just the brevity of human existence. Enjoy what you can while you can, because time stands still for no man. And few places we have ever visited have experienced such an extreme fall from grace as the once adored now abandoned Case Cabin.

In 1862, two brothers of the well-known Case family purchased two acres around the beautiful Case Reservoir in Manchester, Connecticut, and this is where they built their summer home. The Case family were successful industrialists from the area who owned and operated multiple factories and processing plants. The exquisite log cabin was first built in 1917 using sturdy chestnut wood from the neighboring forests. Throughout the early twentieth century, this place was the vacation paradise of the wealthy Case family. But much like the summer beauty, the prestige of this wondrous place eventually waned. The prestige of the family slowly came to end, and the summer home was eventually left behind.

We have visited Case Cabin many times over the years. And with each passing visit, the magic of the grounds disappears ever so slightly. And this was the visit for us where the most changes had been made to the grounds. There was a time where there were no fences, security systems, and renovations. The back and side decks were once accessible, now removed from existence. The entire back house has even been demolished at this point, leaving only a bare foundation of stone walls and broken memories. While a family of chubby bunnies now happily resides within the perimeter, the entire Case Cabin has been sealed off by a chain link fence. A few yards away, the boat house still stands. An old swimming ladder still pokes out of the nearby pond.

Much like the passing days of summer, the time for Case Cabin seems to be sadly drawing to a close. Though she was once enjoyed by the local high society, today she is nothing more than a withering spirit. She is lost to the slow decay of time, at the mercy of the unstoppable sands of the hourglass. But that’s what makes places like this, and summer itself, enjoyable. We know that our time is short, which is what drives us to make the best and most out of each moment. She once had a flourishing history and pedigree. But those days are gone. The sun is slowly setting on this once wondrous and wealthy place. Case Cabin will inevitably be gone someday. But the memories will always be with us.

“The Gods envy us. They envy us because we’re mortal, because any moment might be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we’re doomed. You will never be lovelier than you are now. We will never be here again.” -Troy (2004)

Mansions of Memory

The Abandoned Elmcrest Hospital

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

We’ve explored many different abandoned hospitals in our time. Each one has had their own special little details that make them unique. Undercliff Sanatorium, before her demolition, was full of darkness and danger. Seaside Sanatorium is both captivatingly beautiful and hauntingly tragic. Mansfield Training School is its own Twilight Zone dimension in the middle of a bustling campus community. But today’s subject is a little different. Her name is Elmcrest Hospital, and she is bit more peculiar than most. With a much more intimate setting and a much less trouble past, Elmcrest Hospital stands in a class all her own. Though her future is uncertain, her halls are still full of memory.

 Unlike the other facilities that we listed earlier, Elmcrest Hospital was a private psychiatric treatment center. Opening in the early 1940’s, Elmcrest was established by uniting four mansions together in Portland, Connecticut, to form the facility. For decades Elmcrest Hospital went about its business, serving a small number of patients. In 1997, it was then purchased by the larger Saint Francis Hospital. This is where things took a turn for the worse, a patiently tragically died a year later following an accident. Under increased scrutiny, ownership was transferred to Hartford Hospital shortly after before the grounds closed all together in 2006.

Though many redevelopment proposals have come up, the grounds still remain empty. Visiting Elmcrest Hospital was a bit of a challenge. Lying smack dab on a very busy intersection and featuring some nosy neighbors, we weren’t able to stay very long. Unfortunately, there was not much to see here anyway. The buildings are all boarded up, some even coated in a thicket of vegetation. But what we were able to see was far different from all other abandoned hospitals we have visited. There were no feelings of dread or despair here. There was no graffiti or vandalism. This place did not feel haunted at all. It almost felt hopeful, like it wasn’t ready to give up.

Elmcrest Hospital has no dark secrets, that we know of. This is one of the rare, positive pieces you will find on this site. This place was not creepy or haunting. It was tragic. It was a unique facility and staple of the local community. Talks of demolition or redevelopment have come and gone over the years, but Elmcrest still stands. There is a local movement currently working towards the preservation of Elmcrest – https://www.elmcrestportlandct.com/ – and its good to see people still invested in this place. The grounds have their own unique mystique about them, and it would be shame to see these old mansions of memory fall.

Days Gone By

The Abandoned Car Graveyard

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

We’ve been covering a lot of outdoor stuff recently. But hell, with the weather having been so nice lately, and after a really shitty winter, why not? This place has always been one of my favorites to visit. And before you ask, no we will not be revealing the location of it. People have inquired to us in the past about finding it so in an attempt to scavenge metal and parts from the wrecks. So in an effort to preserve them, we will regrettably not be saying how to find this graveyard. Apologies. But what I can tell you is that it rests alongside the banks of a quiet river on the far reaches of the state. It is quiet as a tomb, and almost entirely untouched by the hands of man.

To the untrained eye, this is merely a quiet wooded area. The only sounds are the faint chirping of the birds and the ambiance of the running river. Unfortunately these woods were also full of ticks. We pulled twelve of those little suckers off us combined. But past the old broken bridge and up the wooded pass lies the most unique graveyard I have ever seen. In place of a line of tombstones, the wrecks of a half dozen classic cars and trucks lie deteriorating into the forest floor. Snakes roam about their interiors. Frightened families of mice roost in their rusted roofs. And these once priceless beauties are now nothing more than piles of junk.

 I have tried to find information about the history or story of this graveyard, but have yet to uncover anything. If anyone has any information, we’d be happy to hear it. How did these old cars get here? The road and any nearby homes are in fact a good distance away. Who did they belong to? Surely someone a long time ago must have once cared for these old wrecks. What strange chain of events led them to their current state? It’s not everyday you see a graveyard of old cars. In good condition, some of these may have been worth a fortune today. In the days gone by, they were once beloved and reliable machines. But now they rot in pieces in a forgotten section of the wild woods.

“One generation passeth away, and another generation cometh: but the earth abideth for ever.” -Ecclesiastes 1:4-11  

Up Horsebarn Hill

The Abandoned UCONN Ski Slope

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

We’ve taken a walk up Horsebarn Hill several times in the past. It’s beautiful out there. It is a much needed touch of farm life a mere stone’s throw away from a hustling and bustling city. Going to school close by, and having many friends up on the campus, the University of Connecticut is a place that I am all too familiar with. But what’s special about this campus is no matter how much you think you know about it, it can still surprise you. We have covered the abandoned corners of UCONN in the past, such as the Depot Campus. And we had heard rumors about the old ski slope for a long time. But now, after all this waiting, we finally went looking for it.

Opening in the 1960’s, the UCONN Ski Slope was at first a booming attraction. Open to both the public and the student body, it was one of many smaller skiing areas to pop up in the area as the sport began to reach its popularity. Sadly, though, most of these smaller ski areas did not survive for long. It was a single slope attraction, featuring a rope tow system to the top of the hill and a few smaller buildings to boot. The UCONN Ski Slope eventually faced its closure a mere ten years later due to budgetary restrictions and a changing climate. It is now a piece of history lost to the wilderness, and something that the campus seems to want to forget.

It was a beautiful Saturday in the waning days of Spring 2017 . We made the trek through the woods and onto Horsebarn Hill, but found only the skeletal remains of the UCONN Ski Slope. Any and all buildings have been lost to the heavy hands of time. The ghostly rope tow system still leads straight to the top of the hill, though her path is now only used by the local deer and coyotes (which we encountered both of on our trip). A few old rusted pieces of metal lie amongst the underbrush. And the main hub of the rope system still stands at the bottom of the hill…barely. Still, it is a very nice hike through what may be the quietest corner of the UCONN campus.

If you’re up for an adventure, take a walk up Horsebarn Hill sometime. You never know what you’ll come across.

The Bridge of Death

The Abandoned Willimantic River Railway

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

“He who approaches the Bridge of Death must answer me these questions three, heir the other side he see.” Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

I love this quote. I always have. My friends and I used to quote this and all the other great lines from the immortal British classic all the time. Hell, I still quote it every once in awhile. It may sound a little extreme for this piece, but there has never been a structure we’ve come across that is more menacing than the abandoned bridge that was once the lifeline of the Willimantic River Railway. We’ve crossed it once before, and it was quite an exhilarating experience. Until our way back across it when the old structure began to creak. That is not a sound you ever want to hear when you’re standing fifty feet in the air over the running waters of the Willimantic River. Heart-stopping as it was, we did make it back safely.  It is an experience that I shall never forget. Though it may have been a bit scary, it was a nice thrill ride to conquer the bridge. Since then, we unofficially christened the old bridge with the quotable nickname. That was over two years ago. So in the early days of spring 2017, we decided to return to the Bridge of Death.

 The official entrance to the Willimantic River can be found on Columbia Avenue. Sitting right before the Columbia/Windham town line, the area is technically a part of the Hop River State Park Trail. Commonly used for biking and hiking, the trail begins here and extends all the way to the Vernon town line. It is describes as a perfect two mile ride or walk for your average outdoorsmen, but it wasn’t always this way. In the mid 1990’s, the town of Willimantic was a hotspot for railways and train yards. One of the older and more prominent lines ran across the picturesque Willimantic River. However, a fierce rainy season during the summer of 1955 caused major flooding in the area. The flooding permanently crippled some of the bridges on the Willimantic River line, causing it to be decommissioned shortly after. Following its closure, the land was converted into a recreational area. The former railway bed was removed and covered with gravel, making the paths perfect for bikers. It is now managed by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Energy and Protection, and maintained by local volunteers and organizations. However, not everything was removed from this former railway line.

Returning to the abandoned Willimantic River Railway was quite different than our first visit. The multiple tent cities had been completely cleared out. A few pieces of junk were still left behind, most notably some beat up bedroom furniture and a deck of playing cards. But the bridge itself still proudly stands…barely. Though she may look just as sardonically beautiful as she once was, we chose not to cross it this time. The old wooden supports for this former workhorse have taken a turn for the worse. And though the water was exceptionally high that day, it was still not worth the risk of crossing it again. Adventurer’s beware. Around the bridge, a lot of old track is still standing. Farther down the line, a couple chunks of old machinery can still be found. Even without crossing the bridge, it is still truly a sight to marvel at. It is a relic of the past, and a testament of fortitude to its original crafters. And while the world around her continues to change at a whirlwind pace, the Bridge of Death is still standing.

Top 10 Abandoned Places to Go Hiking

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Top 10 Abandoned Places to Go Hiking

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

Hiking is the whole reason we ever got into this. We accidentally stumbled upon the abandoned Sunrise Resort while hiking at a state park in Moodus. The rest is history. When we plot an investigation, it is usually to go explore something like a big abandoned building. But every once in awhile, we come across a place that may not be as exciting as an abandoned asylum but is still a fun place to hike. There may not be too much to see, but its nice to just be outdoors and do some exploring. Here are a few of our favorite abandoned places across New England to go hiking!

#10 – Mount Beacon Railway (Beacon, New York)

This may be this most difficult hike on the list, but it is also the most rewarding. In the absolutely beautiful town of Beacon, New York, lie the ruins of the old mountain railway. In the days long since passed, there was a train which ferried passengers to the top of Mount Beacon during the summer/fall seasons. At the summit was a casino and visitor center. Sadly, a terrible fire destroyed this former tourist attraction. Now you can follow the ghostly ruins of the old railway to the top, where you are rewarded with an absolutely breathtaking view of the Hudson River Valley.

#9 – Cohasset Naval Annex (Hingham, Massachusetts)

Fair warning, there will be a lot of military installations in this piece. Located just east of the city of Boston, this former Naval base was once a cornerstone of the local community. It employed hundreds of locals, and served as a watchdog for the Atlantic Ocean during World War II. But, like many military bases from this timeframe, she eventually outlived her purpose and was converted into a state park. There is still plenty to see here, and a few bunkers are still accessible to the public.

#8 – Gillette Castle Railroad (East Haddam, CT)

Smack dab in the middle of one of the most popular parks in Connecticut lies a place that many have forgotten. Gillette Castle was once of the home of prolific stage actor William Gillette. Following his passing a decade ago, he left the grounds to the State of Connecticut to become a public park. But what many don’t know is that the estate once had its own small railway system. There isn’t too much left to see here, but the old train tunnel is a very cool place to walk through.

#7 – Manchester Drive-In (Manchester, CT)

This is another place that we just accidentally stumbled upon. While driving home from the office, I would see a large skeletal frame looming out of the woods. I thought it was just an old billboard, but upon further exploration we uncovered that it was actually the ruins of the old Manchester Drive-In movie theater. Unfortunately, there is not much to see here. But the old sign still sits out front, and the old screen looms high and daunting in the sky. With good weather, it is a really nice hike.

#6 – Aspinwall Hotel (Lenox, MA)

And once again, this was another place we just found. We were staying up in the Berkshires as I had a big audition up there. We went for a short walk by our hotel, and found the ruins of the Aspinwall Hotel. Once one of the most popular hotels in all of New England, this former hotspot was burned to the ground at the turn of the century. Now only ghostly ruins still stand all over the woods. But the picturesque mountain view and the lovely wooded setting make this one a very cool visit.

#5 – Willimantic River Railway (Willimantic, CT)

This place can be a little spooky. It was once part of the lifeblood of the rail system all along the East Coast. Now, she is nothing more than a shadow of her former self. The local homeless population uses this area from time to time as a makeshift tent community. But they periodically seem to get kicked out. Plus stretching over the untamed Willimantic River still stands the old tressell, aka The Bridge of Death. Crossing it is certainly one thing that we crossed off our bucket list. Watch your step, and don’t look down.

#4 – Shade Swamp Shelter (Farmington, CT)

This is certainly one of the more unique and underrated places that we have ever visited. It really doesn’t get enough attention. Once a wildlife shelter and sanctuary, this historic landmark now sits empty in the middle of the woods just off a very busy road. Along a winding trail, there are dozens of old enclosures, cages, and habitats that once housed the former residents of this shelter. On a nice sunny day, this place is not only great for hiking but is also a treasure trove for all you nature photographers out there.

#3 – Nike Missile Site (Portland, CT)

It may be a gigantic pain in the ass to get to, but its really worth it if you can make the trip. Unpaved roads, untamed wilderness, and a total lack of other people can hinder your journey. But if you can find the lost Nike Missile site deep in the woods, you’re in for a real treat. The two sites are about a mile from each other. One features a few still standing structures. The other still has its tunnel system (which we recommend you stay out of). Of all the places on this list, this one is truly all about exploration.

#2 – Rutland Prison Camp (Rutland, Massachusetts)

This place is consistently one of our most popular articles on this site. Located deep in what is now Rutland State Park, the ruins of this old prison lie off the beaten path. Many years ago, this place served as a county jail for small time offenders. They worked off their sentences doing menial tasks related to farm work. But when complications with the local wetlands arose, the prison was forced to close down. What remains are a few old buildings, a small tunnel system, and a very nice hike in. Check it out sometime.

#1 – Chester-Hudson Quarry (Beckett, Massachusetts)

There are honestly few abandoned places that stick with me as much as this one does. Seriously. It is one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen. Abandoned in the 1920’s, the Chester-Hudson Quarry was once one of the largest distributors of stone in all of New England. Following her closure, a noble group of conservationists were able to save the land from real-estate developers and preserve it as a public park. The ruins of the quarry are kept in a state of “arrested decay.” This means they are not repaired, but are maintained just enough so they don’t completely fall apart. It is a very nice walk, just watch out for salamanders.

And that’s our list! Got any other places you think are great for hiking? Be sure to let us know! Don’t forget to like, share, and subscribe.

Black Diamond – The Abandoned Hogback Mountain Ski Area

Posted: December 21, 2016 by kingleser in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Cabin, abandoned home, Abandoned House, abandoned new england, Abandoned Resort, Abandoned Ski Area, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Vermont, Abandoned Wonders, Bird Watching, Birds, Broken, Cabin, Closed, commercial, darkness, Death, Destruction, empty, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, Forgotten, forgotten beauty, forgotten home, Ghosts, Graveyard, Haunting, Hiking, History, Hogback Mountain, House, Information, left behind, lost, Marlborough, Movies, Mystery, nature, new england, nightmares, overgrown, photography, Public Parks, research, Ruins, Safety First, Searching, State Parks, Stories, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, Vermont, writing
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Black Diamond

The Abandoned Hogback Mountain Ski Area

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

I have lived in New England my entire life. I was born here, and I will probably die here too. But I’ve never been a skier. I tried snowboarding when I was a kid. But after splitting my face open a few too many times I eventually outgrew it. Up here in New England, skiing is one of our biggest draws and most memorable past times. Most of you reading this probably know a skier, or even are one yourself. My next door neighbors were all skiers when I was growing up. They even had their own personal lodge up in the mountains. Ski Club was also the largest club at my high school. And the big place where it’s most common? Vermont. This was my first time back here in many years. It was a place I used to visit annually back in the Scouts. Believe it or not this was our first investigation up in the Green Mountain State. And it did not disappoint.

Bordering New York State and the Canadian border, Vermont is one of the most picturesque places in all of New England. It has rolling hills, quiet forests, and an old school mountain culture. Tourism is a big thing here, and the jewel in that crown is skiing. It has been a large part of Vermont’s heritage throughout the years. Many ski areas, such as Mount Snow and Smuggler’s Notch, have become local juggernauts in the business. But many have not been as successful. In southern Vermont is the heavily trafficked Hogback Mountain Conservation Area. But little do most tourists seem to know is that this was once the Hogback Mountain ski area. Opening in the years following World War II, the ski area found moderate success but was eventually forced to fold in the 1980’s due to declining attendance. The land was then sold off to the local community and rechristened.

Right along the busy Route 9 in Marlboro, Vermont, is the Hogback Mountain Tourist Area. You really can’t miss it. You round a corner, and boom. People are everywhere. Cars from all over the world are pulled over at the makeshift parking lot to get a glimpse of the gorgeous mountain view and pick up some campy souvenirs at the gift shop. Their cheese is actually pretty good though. But sitting just off to the side of this tourist attraction are the ghosts of what once was. A short walk to the right from the tourist area is what remains of the ski slope. A small wooden shed still stands, and bears the name of “Hogback Mountain Ski Area.” A large number of old tools and skis have been left behind inside. Though they are now coated with dust, it appears they were simply throw to the floor and forgotten about. Luckily, we found very little signs of vandalism.

The star attraction of the ski area though has got to be the remains of the old chair lift. A large turbine still stands glistened in the sunlight, though she is now rusted to all Hell. The two large wheels which once brought skiers to the top of the slope are now nothing more than tattered ruins. We tried to follow the old slope up the mountain, but the vegetation was too thick. There may be more up there, but we could not find a way up. Walking back to the left of the ski area are what we believe to be the remains of the lodge. A large white building, she now sits precariously close the edge of the mountain. She looks so structurally unsound, its remarkable she’s still standing at all. A few pieces of old furniture still wait inside for someone to return to them. Peeking in through the window was almost like taking a peek back in time.

For our first investigation in the great state of Vermont, this was certainly an interesting visit. I personally found it fascinating to see so many people flocking to the tourist area, and yet experiencing total solitude mere yards away at the ruins of the ski area. It has become a ghost to the rest of the community, haunting the mountain with the memories of its former glory. It is indeed curious why these old relics where not demolished when the land was sold off. While other ski areas flourish and thrive, this one was forced to close up shop. It is good that the land has found another use, and that so many people from so many places can now enjoy it. But it is still sad to see a place like this in a state such as that. For life, as we all know, is a lot like a ski slope. Some are able to navigate it all the way to the bottom and enjoy the ride. Most of us, however, just end up falling on our asses.

Alone, Not Lonely

The Abandoned Pawtucket/Central Falls Train Station

Written by: Sean L.

Photographs by: Sean L.

What does it mean to be lonely? It is a feeling we have all felt at least once in our lives. To some of us, it is feeling we know all to well. But there is a big difference between being alone, and being lonely. Some find solace in it. Others find only fear and despair. Have you ever looked around in a crowd and saw that one person sitting by themselves? They usually pull their phone out of their pocket and mindlessly pretend to be texting someone or calling someone, making sure everyone around them can see. It is like being alone scares them. It is like doing this makes them feel better. For the first time ever, I did this investigation all on my own. I had an audition in Rhode Island, and Amanda was working. It was quite different flying solo, and it really wasn’t the same. I made the hour and a half journey all by myself, not knowing full well what lay ahead of me. In order to make the trip feel more worth while, I stopped by a place I had always had my eye on: The Pawtucket/Central Falls Train Station.

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The historic cities of Pawtucket and Central Falls, Rhode Island, share a border. Both sit just outside of the capital, Providence, and are in close proximity to the Massachusetts state line. Things like this, or even fate perhaps, made them a crossroads for trade. In the early days, both cities had their own personal train stations. But in 1916, this was consolidated to one station which would share the name and interests of both cities. For years she saw hundreds of trains and passengers pass through her doors. But it was not long before she, much like several railroads we’ve covered in the past, began to fall into despair. By 1960, the station had been closed for good after being in such bad shape. Today, she still barely stands. There are currently plans to revive the station and/or rebuild it. The local government is currently planning on using grant money, and hopefully federal funding to bring the old station back to life. But until that days comes, this sad former crossroads now sits abandoned.

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My trip to the former train station was a sad one. It was a bright sunny day, but things just didn’t feel right around here. She sits all alone in the middle of a busy intersection, and looks to still be barely standing anymore. The years have clearly not been too kind to her. All around, the hustle and bustle of the local community continues about its comings and goings. Most don’t pay it any attention at all. I saw a few homeless people snooping around, and a few other characters sitting on the guardrails for their smoke breaks. The place is huge, and well fortified. Or so it would seem. Fences cover the main gate, which is still in pretty good shape. But across the bridge to the other side, the fences have been completely torn down. And a few doors now stand completely wide open to the world. Inside, she seems very structurally unsound and unsafe. Graffiti coats the outside and inside walls. All sorts of junk lies littered about the grounds. And this former train station evokes nothing but a strong feeling of dread.

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Like I said before, there is a difference between being alone and being lonely. To be lonely is to be sad because you’re alone, and to long for companionship. I didn’t see that here. The Pawtucket/Central Falls train station may look grim now, but there may yet be hope for it. Things could turn around if the money is found. But we’ll see. There is a strong feeling amongst the grounds that this old workhorse doesn’t want any visitors, that she just wants to be left in her solitude. Maybe she wants to simply continue her slow descent into destruction. Maybe this is all the future holds for her. She’s seen too much; from her glorious heyday to her dark current state. And the towns around her don’t seem to want much to do with her either. They all seem to have forgotten about this former station. She was once a cornerstone of the New England railroad system. Travelers from all over the country and local community passed through her ornate gates. She now sits all alone, but not lonely.