Archive for the ‘New Haven’ Category

This is The Place – The Abandoned Aerosol Techniques Factory

Posted: March 25, 2022 by kingleser in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Boston, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Connecticut, abandoned factory, Abandoned House, Abandoned Massachusetts, abandoned mill, abandoned new england, Abandoned New Hampshire, Abandoned New York, abandoned paper mill, Abandoned Pennsylvania, Abandoned Places, Abandoned Rhode Island, Abandoned Tower, Abandoned Tunnel, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Vermont, Abandoned Wonders, Art, Broken, Closed, commercial, Connecticut, darkness, Death, Destruction, empty, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, for sale, Forgotten, forgotten beauty, Fortress, Ghosts, Graveyard, Haunting, Hiking, History, Homeless, Information, left behind, lost, Love, Magic, Massachusetts, Movies, Mystery, nature, new england, New Hampshire, New Haven, nightmares, overgrown, photography, Preserved Ruin, Public Parks, research, Rhode Island, Ruins, Safety First, Searching, Stories, time, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, writing
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This is The Place

The Abandoned Aerosol Techniques Factory

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

Glory to Ukraine. Glory to the heroes. It’s been a long and busy winter, but we’ve returned from our annual slumber. And to be perfectly honest, we considered taking this whole year off from exploring. We’re getting older. Things keep getting crazier. And the world continues to grow smaller every day. Plus we’re really running out of places to explore. Plus, you know, gas prices. So we decided to just enjoy our break, and see how we felt when the seasons changed. It was nice to take a breather, but the call of adventure and the need to create was eventually too much. This site has, is, and always will be our creative outlet. We love writing. We love taking photographs. And we love interacting with all of you. Art is funny that way. It’s funny. When you look at people all over the world who don’t have to be worry about going to work everyday, art is the thing that most end up pursuing. No matter the kind. Creative expression is something that just calls out to all of us. And it can come in so many different shapes, sizes, and forms. And there is no better example of that than places like our first subject of the year.

And so, my friends, allow me to introduce the abandoned Aerosol Techniques Factory. A few months ago, Atlas Obscura, one of my favorite websites, did a story on the abandoned Union Pond Mill in Manchester, CT. We covered this place many years ago, and they linked our article on their page. Thus, we started getting a lot of traffic to our site from this story. And from that traffic, we got a lot of emails and comments. One of these highly suggested we go check out a similar place that was nearby: The Aerosol Techniques Factory. The facility was constructed during the 1960’s and wore many different hats throughout her era. The main purpose was the production of Aerosol products and eventually, just like Union Pond Mill, recycled plastic bottles. The factory was unfortunately forced to close its doors during the 1990’s and has been abandoned ever since. It’s ownership remains murky, and all attempts to redevelop the property have sadly fallen through. But again, just like Union Pond Mill, the derelict facility has found new life as a makeshift skate park and a vast canvas for local graffiti artists.

We made our trek out to the abandoned factory on a pale spring day, still slightly clinging to winter’s chill. It was a long drive for us, but it felt good to be back out on the road again. We chatted about old adventures. We sang songs from the radio. We navigated the usual New Haven traffic. And eventually, we reached our destination. See, the legality of this property remains elusive to me. Many sources say that there is no current owner. Yet others say that there is NO TRESPASSING allowed. So we weren’t quite sure what we were walking into. And to top things off, Aerosol Techniques factory is sitting right out in the open. Most abandoned factories we’ve explored over the years are lost in the woods, cut off from the rest of the world. The same cannot be said for this old workhorse. Instead of cutting it off, the world instead just grew around the abandoned factory. It’s just sitting there totally exposed, sharing a parking lot with a hotel and a home improvement store. Yikes. I hate abandoned places that are totally exposed like this. You never know who might be watching. But we came all this way. We decided to check it out.

As we hesitantly walked into the abandoned factory, another young couple was casually walking out of it. Contrary to us, they didn’t seem to have a care in the world. They even gave us a friendly greeting as we passed by. Curious, but we cautiously moved forward. The abandoned factory is huge. It is made up of three different structure, loosely connected by narrows causeways. Almost every inch of this place is coated with various forms of graffiti and everything wreaks of spray paint. It’s ironic that the thing this place used to produce is now the weapon of artistry used against it. The insides are all terribly gutted. Some machinery has been left behind to rust into oblivion. The first two structures are all open air, so we were able to get some great photos. The causeway connecting the middle section to the main hub is the true highlight of this place. But speaking of the main hub, this is where flashlights are required. In order to get a good feel of this section, you must descend down a rickety staircase into the darkness below. It is all quite creepy, yet eerily exhilarating. But when the light peaks through, there is just more graffiti.

We didn’t stay too long. No bad vibes here. It’s just too out in the open. Once we had covered every inch of the grounds and gotten all the pictures we desired, it was time to head out. As we were exiting, we crossed paths with yet another young couple. These two, however, were clearly here for a different purpose. By the time we got to our car, we could hear the shaking of an aerosol bottle and the fierce spray of paint. More graffiti artists. But just like the last couple, these two clearly didn’t care who saw them or knew they were there. It always fascinates me when abandoned places get like this. To the rest of the world, they become just an eye soar. Something to be shunned and avoided. But to a select few, they can become something fun and beautiful. Though still barely standing, this old industrial titan has found a new life. And some of the art adorning its ancient halls is actually quite good. Like us, folks from all walks of life visit this place for one reason or another. Some come to the abandoned Aerosol Techniques Factory to see the art. Some come to create it. But whichever you seek, this is the place.

The Top 5 Abandoned Places of 2021

Posted: December 22, 2021 by kingleser in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Airport, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Boston, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Cars, Abandoned Connecticut, Abandoned Drive-In, Abandoned Farm, Abandoned Forts, Abandoned Golf Course, Abandoned House, Abandoned Massachusetts, abandoned military bases, abandoned new england, Abandoned New Hampshire, Abandoned New York, Abandoned Park, Abandoned Pennsylvania, Abandoned Places, Abandoned Railway, Abandoned Rhode Island, Abandoned Road, Abandoned Statues, Abandoned Theaters, Abandoned Tower, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Vermont, Abandoned Wonders, Broken, Cedar Hill, Christmas, Cinema, Closed, commercial, Connecticut, darkness, Death, Destruction, Disney, Exploration, fantasy, Forgotten, Forts, Ghosts, Graveyard, Haunting, Hiking, History, Information, Massachusetts, Military, Military Forts, Movies, Mystery, nature, Navy, new england, New Hampshire, New Haven, New York, Pennsylvania, photography, Public Parks, Rhode Island, Ruins, Searching, Stories, Trains, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, writing
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The Top 5 Abandoned Places of 2021

By: Lassie and Wilk

It’s been another rough year for all of us. But it has also been a time for healing. We have all been through so much, and we’re not out of the storm yet. To everyone following Abandoned Wonders, thank you for being a part of our adventures and staying strong. We’ve covered a lot of cool abandoned places this year. But only five can make it onto our annual list. So please enjoy our new video covering the Top 5 Abandoned Places of 2021.

Happy Holidays to all, Happy New Year, and we’ll see you in Spring 2022.

The Other Side of the Tracks — The Abandoned Cedar Hill Rail Yard

Posted: January 12, 2015 by Hidden Wonders Photography in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Connecticut, abandoned new england, Abandoned Railway, Abandoned Stores, Abandoned train station, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Wonders, Birds, Broken, Cedar Hill, Closed, commercial, Connecticut, darkness, Death, Destruction, empty, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, fire, for sale, Forgotten, forgotten beauty, Ghosts, Graveyard, Haunting, Hiking, History, Homeless, House, Information, left behind, lost, Movies, Mystery, nature, new england, New Haven, nightmares, overgrown, photography, Public Parks, research, Ruins, Safety First, Searching, State Parks, Stories, The Walking Dead, time, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, Walking Dead, writing, WWII
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The Other Side of the Tracks

The Abandoned Cedar Hill Rail Yard

Written by: Wilk

Photographs by: Lassie

A lot of strange things can happen to a place when it is abandoned. Where man once dwelled, nature begins to take back. Structures slowly crumble under the weight of time. But worst of all, the deserted manner of these places tends to attract a lot of lawlessness and delinquency. No such place we have ever visited exemplified these characteristics more so than Cedar Hill. This forgotten rail yard has become its own little world, a place where nightmares come to life. There are things here and a presence in the air that Amanda’s pictures can show a Hell of a lot better than my words ever could. You must see Cedar Hill in order to believe it. Though it is not too far from civilization, you will find anything but in this place that the world forgot about a long time ago.

Located in the busy town of North Haven, Connecticut, Cedar Hill was once one of the largest and most active rail depots in all of New England. Not too far from the coast of Long Island Sound, Cedar Hill was once a part of the flourishing network of railways that run all along the east coast. The yard was built along the Quinnipiac River and surrounding marshlands. It was originally built in the early 1920’s to help support the New Haven area’s quickly flourishing railway industry. As transportation methods began to advance and World War II came to close, the Cedar Hill rail yard began to grow quiet. Within a few years, the facility was all but abandoned. We could not find an exact year of closure or exact reason. A newer and much more modern rail yard now stands right beside the old grounds.

Our trip to Cedar Hill was on a humid summer day and took us down the infamously busy I-91. From the highway, you can still see several parts of the rail yard. Most notably visible are the old towers, though they are now wrapped in thick vines and vegetation. Cedar Hill is hard to find, and for good reason. It can only be accessed through the back parking lot of one of the neighboring department stores. Curiously, there was a large sign out front saying that the property was for sale. We eventually found the trail that took us along the banks of the Quinnipiac River, until we reached the old tracks. They are heavily rusted and overgrown, but these tracks are the lifeline of the facility. We followed them further into the yard, and used them as a focus point in case we got lost.

Our first stop off the tracks led us into a clearing. More tracks led us farther into the yard, where we found a tipped over and dirtied baby carriage along with lots of other litter. Along the fences of the neighboring active rail yard are the abandoned terminals/storage facilities. Though the windows had all been smashed, the door leading into one of the buildings was still in one piece. Inside, these buildings are completely shot out. There were still a few protective fences. The walls and floors were cement. The roof had even caved in big time in one section. Strange little bunkers had been set up all over the floor. Apparently, local kids have been using the inside of this building as a paintball course. Pink paintball splatters were scattered across the walls and floor. Several other buildings were just like this.

Farther down the tracks, we found just a large clearing covered in debris. All kinds of trash littered the ground in this one spot. We also found a few smaller buildings directly beside the tracks. They seemed to be power sheds of some kind, as they were all connected with the old power lines. We also found an old warehouse towards the back of the facility. There was yet another makeshift paintball course outside of the building. In close proximity to the warehouse is the old power station, with a lot of rusting equipment and barely legible warning signs still standing. Throughout the facility, there are multiple towers overlooking the surrounding areas. The ladders leading the top of these towers have all been cut short so nobody can safely climb them. There is also a lot of wild vegetation growing all over the towers.

The most unsettling thing about Cedar Hill was the evidence we found of people still living here. Scattered amongst different spots in the facility, we found large animal skeletons and skulls. We even found a deer’s freshly severed leg at one point. Due to its proximity to the nearby marshes, this could simply be a large predator. However, we also found several fire pits nearby with old cooking equipment, pots, and pans. The creepiest part of our investigation was what we found in the tunnels. Right beside the banks of the river in a large open tunnel, leading deep underground with no end in sight. Not only did we hear voices coming from inside the tunnel, we even captured on camera what appear to be the figures of two people deep in the tunnels. We had heard rumors of homeless people living back here, clearly they were true. We chose to stay out of the tunnels.

We went into this investigation expecting to find an abandoned rail yard. What we found was much more than that. We found a world all on its own. In the absence of civilization, nature rules. The strongest survive. The weak get taken. There are no rules in places like Cedar Hill. We left this place with a very uneasy feeling, and for the first time ever, we would not recommend anyone reading this to ever visit this place. It is very dangerous, with darkness lurking around every corner. It is a place out of a nightmare, as if an episode of The Walking Dead had come to life. Trash and broken hunks of metal are scattered about. It is almost completely silent at all times. Human beings live in deplorable conditions. Innocence has been lost. And you can never quite shake the feeling that you’re being watched when you cross over, to the other side of the tracks.