Archive for the ‘Napatree Point’ Category

Top 5 Abandoned Places to Visit this Summer

Posted: February 3, 2017 by kingleser in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Baseball Field, Abandoned Business, Abandoned Cabin, Abandoned Cape Cod, Abandoned Connecticut, Abandoned Forts, Abandoned Hospital, Abandoned House, Abandoned Massachusetts, abandoned military bases, abandoned new england, Abandoned Rhode Island, Abandoned Sanatorium, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Wonders, Bates Motel, Beaches, Cape Cod, Children's Hospital, Connecticut, empty, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, Forgotten, Fort Wetherill, Fortress, Forts, Hiking, History, Massachusetts, Military, Military Forts, Movies, Mystery, Napatree Point, new england, Ocean, Ocean View, photography, Public Parks, Rhode Island, Ruins, Seaside Sanatorium, State Parks, Stories, Truro, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, Waterford, writing
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Winter sucks. I mean it really sucks sometimes. Especially if you live here in New England. One day it will be fifty degrees out. The next day there will be a foot of snow on the ground. Hooray. Things can be a bit unpredictable. As such, we usually slow down a bit on our adventures during the winter. When you’re exploring a place that you really aren’t supposed to be at, leaving footprints in the snow is never a good idea. Plus most of these places get really cold during the winter time. So, since we don’t really have anything new for you guys right now, it’s time to look ahead. Sitting here, with a few inches of snow on the ground outside, here are the Top 5 Abandoned Places to Visit this Summer.

#5 – Seaside Sanatorium, Waterford, Connecticut

We talk about Seaside Sanatorium a lot on here. But it really is a cool place. Sitting pretty right on the lovely Long Island Sound, this place has changed quite a bit over the years. Built in the early 1920’s, this massive hospital has seen a lot. It was regrettably closed in the 1990’s, and has declined ever since. Due to its status as a National Park, it is heavily frequented by beach-goers. Yet none of them seem to pay attention to this place. In our most recent visit, fences and major construction has taken over Seaside Sanatorium. Though round the clock security guards protect the abandoned asylum, it is still a beautiful sight to see.

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#4 – Bates Motel, Truro, Massachusetts 

Is it really called Bates Motel? We don’t know. Hell, nobody seems to know. That is just the moniker that this mysterious abandoned motel has earned due to its similarity to the legendary locale from Psycho. We love this place because it is just so mysterious. Located in a flourishing beach-side community, Bates Motel is a creepy and ramshackle relic of days gone by. The sun shines brightly overheard, and the beautiful blue ocean stands at her back. Yet she remains quiet as a tomb. In recent years, it has diminished greatly. Yet she still stands, waiting for something that will never come.

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#3 – Fort Mansfield, Watch Hill, Rhode Island

This one is a bit of a hike. It really is a pain in the ass to find, especially if the wind is blowing. Its about a mile down Nappatree Point, hidden amongst a bird sanctuary. But if you can find it, this old coastal fortress really is something special. Hidden amongst the sea grass and wild vegetation lies the remains of Fort Mansfield. Due to a fatal flaw in her design, she was deemed unfit for use by the military and eventually retired. It is quite similar to her cousin Fort Wetherill, which we’ll get to. But Fort Mansfield is far more desolate and much more isolated. What’s left makes for a very cool and unique adventure, if you can brave the long walk down the sandy beach.

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#2 – North Truro Air Force Station, Truro, Massachusetts

Yes, another great place to visit on Cape Cod. It may be one of the most picturesque parts of New England, but it has its share of secrets. And one of the best kept ones is this abandoned military base. It is the largest place on this list, and completely legal to visit. Left empty since the nineties, this old Cold War base is now nothing more than a ghost town. Dozens of old houses still stand. The old helipad is still there. The baseball field is now wild and overgrown. There is so much to see here. We literally spent an entire day exploring this place, taking hundreds of photos. It really is that awesome.

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#1 – Fort Wetherill, Jamestown, Rhode Island

Our piece that wrote on this place is still the most popular one we have ever written. And for good reason. Fort Wetherill really is a magical place. Sitting right outside the luxurious community of Newport, Rhode Island, this abandoned fortress sits right at the edge of the sea. It is certainly one of the toughest abandoned places we have ever visited, in the sense that this place has been through a lot and still stands. It is completely legal to visit, and unfortunately many vandals take advantage of that. But her graffiti covered exterior just makes this place that much more hauntingly beautiful.

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And that’s our list! Did we miss any out? Are there any cool places in New England that you plan on visiting this summer? Let us know in the comments. Likes, shares, and such are always appreciated!

Fortress of Solitude – The Abandoned Fort Mansfield

Posted: March 19, 2015 by Abandoned Wonders and Hidden Wonders Photography in #postaday, Abandoned, Abandoned Attractions, Abandoned Forts, abandoned military bases, abandoned new england, Abandoned Rhode Island, Abandoned USA, Abandoned Wonders, Beaches, Bird Watching, Birds, Broken, Closed, darkness, Destruction, Exploration, exploring the abandoned, Forgotten, forgotten beauty, Fort Wetherill, Fortress, Forts, Ghosts, Graveyard, Haunting, Hiking, History, Information, left behind, lost, Military, Military Forts, Mystery, Napatree Point, nature, new england, nightmares, Ocean, Ocean View, overgrown, photography, Public Parks, research, Rhode Island, Ruins, Safety First, Searching, seaside, Stories, time, Uncategorized, Urban Decay, Urban Exploration, Urban Exploring, Urbex, writing, WWII
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Fortress of Solitude

The Abandoned Fort Mansfield

Written by: Sean L.

Photographs by: Amanda H.

   The waves of the ocean crash up against the sandy shore. Fierce gusts of wind shriek through the tall sea grass. Packs of white gulls soar overhead, cackling and cawing to each other. The sun shines powerful and radiant in the sky. The deep Atlantic water is an enchanting shade of bright blue. This is Napatree Point, Rhode Island. And somewhere, lost in the vegetation of this place, lays an abandoned military fortress. The ramparts crumble as they slowly succumb to the barrage of time. Dark and empty corridors are haunted by the ghosts of the past. What once served as the first defense of the American homeland now lies in total silence. This is Fort Mansfield, forgotten by some and a legend to others. Unlike one of the other famous abandoned military forts in Rhode Island, Fort Wetherill (see our write-up here), this former coastal artillery instillation has been all but lost to the white sands of Napatree Point. Located in the village of Watch Hill, Fort Mansfield was one of our most difficult treks, but also one of our most rewarding discoveries.

Fort Mansfield has called Napatree Point home since its creation in the early twentieth century. The point is a small piece of land branching out from the town of Watch Hill. The United States military first purchased the property in 1898, as part of a new program to install artillery batteries all along the coast of New England. Though it may not have as rich of a history as Fort Wetherill, Mansfield does have a much sadder story than its legendary cousin. The fort was officially commissioned in 1902. However, during the war games of the early 1900’s, a fatal flaw was discovered in the fort’s design. The guns of the fort would be unable to repel a head-on assault from the sea, and it would be an easy target for an amphibious assault. Thus, the fort was decommissioned from active status in 1909. Over the years, the garrison of the fortress slowly dwindled as the military lost all interest and faith in it. The land was finally sold back to the town of Watch Hill in 1928. The fortress has remained abandoned ever since.

Having heard whispers of Fort Mansfield in the past without ever finding much information about it, we decided to go searching for it during the fall of 2014. As a burrow of the town of Westerly, Watch Hill is quite the summer hotspot, but it goes quiet during the offseason. Napatree Point is perfectly legal to walk, except for the handful of beachside bungalows at the very beginning. There is a nice little parking lot that is free to park at right in the middle of downtown Watch Hill. After parking, we began our walk down the point. There is beach on either side of the point, with thick vegetation in the middle. This is also a bird sanctuary during the summer nesting season. It is roughly a little over a mile to the very tip of the point. It is also fiercely windy due to the proximity to the ocean. The early stages of the point are decently trafficked by beachgoers, but the end of the point is deserted. After a long time combing through the point’s thick grass, we finally came upon the abandoned fortress.

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The fortress is comprised of two sections: one part contains the first two artillery instillations and the second section is a brief walk away containing the third instillation. There were once a few buildings here, but they have long since been demolished. The first section is a pretty good size. Though it is not as covered in graffiti as Fort Wetherill, Fort Mansfield is still pretty vandalized. Lots of tagging covers the walls, and there is plenty of liter down in the lower tunnels. The local fire department had put up some fencing around the outer walls of the fort to prevent visitors from getting in, but they are quite easily bypassed via a few still functioning ladders and former staircases. Several metal slabs have also been placed over certain points. Except for the blistering gusts of wind, this place is completely silent. There are several entrance points down to the lower levels. Since the front walls have been knocked out, there is a decent amount of light down here. The floor is also completely flooded in certain rooms from years of rain and high tides.

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The second section of the fort is a brief walk down an overgrown path. It sits on the very edge of Napatree Point, giving an excellent view of the Rhode Island coastline. It is much smaller than the first section of the fort, and is much more difficult to see. Tall sea grass and vegetation keep it very well hidden. The graffiti here is actually much more light hearted than the first section. At the very top of the fort, there are a couple of small staircases leading up to what must have once been look out posts. They provide excellent cover from the merciless wind. Unlike the first section, there are no barricades or fences to deter visitors here. Down to the lower levels, there are several large empty rooms. They are in complete darkness, yet they are completely empty save for the trash of vandals. Someone, or something, is most definitely living here. While exploring the dark passages of the lower levels, we heard something moving around in the tunnels. We didn’t stick around to find out what it was.

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Though it is a bit of a trek and can be difficult to find if you don’t know where to look, Fort Mansfield is definitely worth a visit. Unlike the legendary Fort Wetherill, this abandoned base is not home for teenage destruction and vandalism. Because of its remote location, the fort is only enjoyed by those who are willing to make the journey. The fierce winds and the hot sand make it a tough trek, but the fort is more than worth it. While the coastal town around it continues to grow and flourish, Fort Mansfield continues to stray out of thought and time. It is the ruins of a fortress that never got to be. Its run as a coastal artillery unit was cut tragically short by a fatal flaw. Now the land weeps, haunted by a purpose that it never got to fulfill. It is truly a fortress of solitude; quiet and alone, but still standing guard over its former territory.

View on the walk back